Resources

Historic Sites and Structures Survey [HSSS]

Lacasse Farm, Williston
Lacasse Farm, Williston
Surveying Vermont’s historic resources is the foundation of our preservation program. Statewide survey began in earnest in 1967 and strengthened by the Vermont Historic Preservation Act of 1975. During this time, more than 30,000 historical, architectural and archaeological properties have been recorded and added to the state’s inventory of historic sites; the Historic Sites and Structures Survey (HSSS).

National Register of Historic Places

Rockingham Meetinghouse, Rockingham, VT
Rockingham Meetinghouse, Rockingham, VT
The National Register of Historic Places, established in 1966 by the National Historic Preservation Act and managed by the National Park Service, is the official list of buildings, structures, sites, objects, and districts that embody the historical and cultural foundations of our country.

Identifying Historic Resources

Vermont's historic resources include buildings, structures, landscapes, and archaeological sites, both on land and underwater. If you want to know the historic status of your property or learn about the history of your community, please use our Online Resource Center.

Partners

Strong communities are built and maintained through partnerships. Partners share responsibilities, bring resources to the table and contribute to better outcomes.  The partners listed below represent key interests likely to be involved in any community development effort and can help you or your community in your land use planning and community development efforts.

Resources and Rules

Planning Statutes and Rules
State statutes outline how municipalities can govern land use.  In addition to Chapter 117, the Planning and Development Act, a number of other, sometimes hard-to-find statutes, are listed.

Planning Publications
Department publications, data and historical planning documents to support land use planning in Vermont.

Vermont Economic Resiliency Initiative (VERI)

Bethel Downtown
Bethel, Vermont
Vermont’s hard-won experience from flooding taught a key lesson – no individual, business, organization, town or state agency can reduce flood vulnerabilities alone. Projects like the Vermont Economic Resiliency Initiative (VERI) and other studies and related initiatives deepened partnerships and identified new opportunities advance an integrated, long-term strategy to:

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